A BIGSOUND Chat With Fractures

Whilst running into Woodes everywhere at BIGSOUND, Fractures stopped by to talk creative getaways, collaborations and his upcoming album. Photos by Rochelle Flack, and a big thanks to Bloodhound Bar for lining us up with a beaut space.

YOU JUST DROPPED YOUR NEW SINGLE ALCHEMY, TELL US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT IT?

Like any song, I locked myself in a dark room and found a bunch of sounds I liked and assembled them. It’s kind of like weird wizardry. You just end up with a song and you’re like “oh okay, where did that come from?” It was one of those ones. I locked myself in my manager’s beach house and came up with a couple of songs and ‘Alchemy’ was one of them, so I thought it was a good indication of what was going to happen for the other released on the other album.

DO YOU FIND TAKING YOURSELF AWAY TO AN ISOLATED PLACE HELPS YOUR PROCESS?

Yeah it does, working solo definitely. If I can just lock myself in and live in the internet and the luxuries that’s always desirable. And if you’re isolated you can bang away into the depths of the night, I’m a night guy so if I could have my way that’s how I would do it.

YOU RECENTLY COLLABORATED WITH SET MO, HOW DID THAT COME ABOUT?

I think it was a back room kind of thing, the managers again probably, just putting people together who are viable. More often than not they’ll send out an instrumental and say put down what you think is good and they’ll guide it. They did that a little bit with this one, and then for whatever reason they gave it to someone else, but they said let’s write a song. So I came up to Sydney and actually wrote the whole song with them. It was a bit different for them and a bit different for me. It’s kind of one of the only collabs I’ve had released so it seems to be being received pretty well. I’ve had snapchats from people in Turkey about it so it was a good result in the end.

YOU MENTIONED SOME COLLABORATIONS HAVEN’T BEEN RELEASED. DO YOU THINK THEY’LL EVER SEE THE LIGHT OF DAY?

I probably shouldn’t talk about it like I do it that frequently, because for the moment I’ve been a bit album-centric – it’s been a lot of me, me, me. So I haven’t had a huge amount of time to do that stuff, but the few that I have done I’d say only one or two are finished products. As soon as you start working via email things sometimes decimate. You have to be in the room with them, so all the people that don’t live in Melbourne for whatever reason, I can’t get my head around that, we’re working on it. So whenever I’m up in Sydney I try to work on those, it’s just about getting schedules to match up. So hopefully I can finish them and make a million dollars, if I was getting one dollar for every Spotify play I’d be laughing (laughs).

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YOUR MUSIC IS ALL SELF WRITTEN, RECORDED AND PRODUCED, HOW DOES THE DYNAMIC CHANGE WHEN YOU JUMP INTO A COLLABORATION?

I suppose it depends what angle they’re coming from and where I’m coming from. I can fend for myself if I have to, but if they want to write I’m also happy to sit back and just do a top line and melody. I think I can do that pretty well. Vice versa if I want to write the music for them and they do the top line, that works equally as well. You kind of just figure it while you’re in the room.

YOU’RE WORKING ON AN ALBUM AT THE MOMENT, AT WHAT STAGE IS IT AT?

I would say it is in the final stages, let’s say around the 70% mark. The songs are done, they’re written and complete, some just have to be polished and mixed. Some need a few tweaks and a bit of sparkle put on them to make them sound nice for people who decide to listen to them. But year it’s definitely in the latter stages which is exciting. So it’s due for release early next year.

HOW DO YOU THINK YOU’VE DEVELOPED YOUR SOUND SINCE THE FIRST EP?

I mean, it’s been a pretty natural progression I suppose, dull answer but it’s just an extension of what I was doing. I’ve gone pretty linear, I haven’t gone left or right and no one’s going to be going “what the fuck is he doing?” There’s no keytar or throat choirs.

What about Mandolin?

I don’t know if I’d play that well enough but I’ll think about it. But I would say it’s a bit more band orientated now, there’s still the electronic stuff, but having played live shows it’s not as fun when the drummer’s just whacking an electronic drum pad, so it also makes it a bit more inclusive for them and it gives a better feeling on stage.

I’VE GOT ONE LAST QUESTION FOR YOU, WE’RE UP AT BIGSOUND SO HOW’S THE EXPERIENCE BEEN FOR YOU?

For the two hours I’ve been here not ideal. I had some accommodation issues, but now I’m on the 72nd floor so that’s pretty cool. I’ve got a good view. I’ve had a couple interviews too. I feel like I’ve been following Woodes around, the last three interviews it’s been her warming the seat for me. But so far so good.

WHAT DO YOU HAVE PLANNED FOR YOUR SHOWCASES?

It’s pretty strange because you have no concept who is going to show up or how many people will show up, so you’ve just got to put your best foot forward regardless of how empty the room may be due to other hype bands playing the same time as you. But you just treat it as a normal gig I suppose, it just happens to be half the length, so you have to filter out the shit. It’s all killer, no filler. I timed my set, you get a half hour block and I’ve got it at 27 minutes so I have three minutes for quality chat.

Fractures will support EMMA LOUISE on her upcoming tour. Watch the live video for Alchemy here.

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